Mobile Journalism: The New Media

Mobile journalism is a recent form of media that has emerged as a result of our advancements in technology. Nowadays, almost everybody has a smart phone, and if so, they carry it around with them wherever they go. As a result, people are constantly giving live updates to applications such as Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, and even through text messages and email, to name just a few. These updates are often posted as they occur in real time and can take various forms such as text, video, audio, and photographs. The smartphone really does it all!

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Mobile journalists, or mojos, as they are often referred, have used these developments to their benefit. Instead of having to bring bulky tape recorders, or oversized video cameras  to events or interviews, they can just simply bring their iPhone out. Neal Augenstein, a radio journalist stationed in Washington D.C. expresses this perfectly, “Since 2010 I’ve been doing all my field reporting just with my iPhone and iPad.” Applications have even been created to assist in smart phone editing, recording, and posting, to make news reporting from a mobile device that much easier, and the presentation that much more professional. Applications range from Call Recorder, which records phone calls and interviews, to shooting and editing software applications such as Splice, and Magisto that assist in delivering precise and relevant content.

In addition to smart phones’ many features and capabilities, another advantage of the hand-held device is it gives journalists the ability to capture anything that may occur while they’re out and about. If something happens when journalists are on the move, they can simply take out their phones, capture it, and then share it with their audience. This accessibility is most likely one of the biggest advantages of having a smart phone. Anything can be posted to an online newspaper or application directly from a phone, as quickly as possible, or even live, as it is happening. Journalists no longer have to wait to get back to the office or to get to their computers to record what occurred because they can explain it and even show it as it is going on. Stephen Quinn, an experienced mojo, defines mobile journalism, “mojo is editing on mobile phones as well as the shooting..It’s also captioning, putting headlines and credits. Real mojo, true mojo is doing everything with a mobile phone.” And it’s easy! With the availability of smart phone access and with apps that allow us to record and capture events in real time, journalism coverage has taken a whole new form, and, it is faster and easier than ever before.

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